brandFramework

Using Customer Experience to build your brand

By: Daniel Fu | 6 Oct 2015

Your company brand encompasses the entire perception of your organization through the eyes of your customers, clients, and employees. Branding consists of more than just your logo and type-face selections; it is how the public (usually users and/or customers) experiences your business. How you position your brand can certainly define the customers’ experience of your organization. However, consider first planning great experiences for your users and customers in order to develop a more customer-centric brand identity. Changing to this strategy requires a solid understanding of your users and customers as well as a thoroughly considered mission statement prior to developing your brand.

UNDERSTAND YOUR USERS AND CUSTOMERS

Knowing who your business is intended to cater to will help you to plan all of the touch-points your customers and clients will have with you, from the in-person experience to the web and social media experience to even the look and feel of business cards you hand out. For example, if your target audience consists of Millenials, your language and messaging would be different than if it consisted of top level executives and managers. User experience research techniques can be used to help define different customer/client personas. These personas can be used essentially as avatars for your customer base. As new services or features are developed, keep these personas in mind to ensure that these new offerings align with their needs and desires. At times, new personas might replace or get added to the list.

RELY ON YOUR MISSION STATEMENT

Your mission statement defines the core purpose of your business. There’s a delicate balance required between keeping it broad enough to encompass your long term, yet narrow enough to define your identity for both your employees and your customers. A good mission statement represents what you stand for in specific, actionable ways. It paves the way for how your employees interact with your customers. The length of your mission statement may range from a sentence or two to several paragraphs, a good rule of thumb would be to keep it as succinct as possible in order to avoid providing too narrow a focus and thus reducing strategic flexibility. Also, keep in mind that your mission statement can evolve over time to adjust for the market, your competitors, and your customer’s needs and desires.

DESIGN YOUR USER AND CUSTOMER EXPERIENCES

The broad definition of User and Customer Experience includes how your customers interact with all facets of your business. Rely on your mission statement and understanding of your customers to help define how you want those interactions to occur instead of leaving it to chance and risking a negative experience. For instance, if you wish to present your organization as caring and supportive to your user base, friendlier language and a welcoming user interface on your website or software would communicate your caring and empathic intent.

User and Customer Experience is about setting and meeting the users’ expectations through clarity of messaging and purpose. Keeping their experiences in mind at all times when developing your business processes will help ensure that your customers stay positively engaged with your organization.

By tailoring your business strategies around your customers’ expectations and the driving force behind your mission statement, you can create specific user and customer experiences.  These experiences reinforce their expectations and your mission statement, creating a sustainable, healthy feedback loop. For example, McDonalds recently responded to customer requests by running focus groups to test the viability of providing all-day breakfast service to their fans. Before simply agreeing to these requests (the first of which were posted in 2007!), McDonalds tested the viability of the service through focus group and user testing in small markets in order to ensure that the service could be provided within customer expectations. This is a great example of using feedback and relying on thorough user and customer research to improve brand perception through ensuring consistent customer experience, even for new offerings.1

By leveraging this valuable feedback loop to guide the underlying framework of your business decisions, you can ensure that your organization adjusts to changing expectations and trends, keeping your brand fresh and relevant for as long as possible – while keeping your customer’s engaged.

1The Story of How McDonald’s All-Day Breakfast Came to Be

 

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